Tee hee hee

What she wore: white capris (here in the sourth, Easter is the official harbinger of white below the waist), teal tee with an itty-bitty pocket, teal slides with a kitten heel.  The girls liked the shoes, but my new ‘do far over-shadowed their fabulosity.


It’s Monday, so I won’t burden you with anything too heavy-duty.  Just a little tidbit, from my experience with kids from other ethnic backgrounds.
 
Last Thursday I cut my hair.  The kids have not seen it yet.  I knew this was going to cause a lot of reaction because something like cutting your hair always creates a stir among students.  They don’t expect us to change AT ALL!
 
So, I’m in the hall and one of the kids calls out, "Oh, Mrs. Mo still has her Easter hair."  For those of you that don’t know what this means, he was stating that my hair ‘do from Easter Sunday was still on my head.  Nevermind that a white girl would rather die than have someone think she doesn’t wash her hair regularly.  Most of my kids have a hair style for a week or two, and after a dance they proudly keep their hair in that up ‘do as long as it will hold.
 
I digress. The student did not realize that I had cut my hair.  I went over to show him that I had cut it.  He looked closely.  "You mean it’s not going to go back to the way it was?" he asked.  He was dumbfounded. 
 
For African Americans hair is more flexible–it can be short one week and long the next.  Up in the fall, braided in the spring.  Different colors and different styles are common.  Never ask, "is she the girl with curly hair?" because one days it’s curly and the next it’s been "permed" straight.
 
But, I had an ace in my pocket he didn’t see coming–"feel how soft it is," I said and let him touch my hair.  Soft curls are something that most of my kids have never felt. I let all the kids touch my new hair ‘do and they all agreed–cutting it was worth it if I got to have such soft hair. 
 
I know how these kids think!
 
KM
 
I realize that letting a bunch of adolescents touch your hair might sound a bit strange to some, but for me it’s just an extension of their education–now they have a little bit of knowledge about a group of people that are different than they are.
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About takedeux

In one summer I had a baby who was hospitalized for five weeks, quit my job, and moved back to my hometown. This blog is about starting over.
This entry was posted in Race Relations. Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to Tee hee hee

  1. Unknown says:

    Will I be first to comment????
    Summer is so very here (Spring lasted about a week) and I am so ready to cut my hair that I have been growing for the past year.  Wouldn\’t hubby be surprised?
     
    Ashlie

  2. Unknown says:

    Yessss!!  I did it!  Speed typing worked.

  3. Carol says:

    I love the new picture!  Glad you survived back to school. 
    ~Carol

  4. Sue says:

    Isn\’t it amazing the looks on their faces and how much they want to touch your hair??  LOL.  They are going to remember many years from now.
     
    Sue

  5. Jennifer says:

    i bought a white skirt this weekend and thought that it might be too soon to wear it. but i see i am in the clear! 
     
     i like short hair for the spring/summer. 
     
     i was just reading your goals.  I too try to read a book a week.  somebody gave me "the kite runner" and insisted that i start reading  it right away.  but it must sit in the  queue on the nightstand and wait its turn like all the other books.

  6. Laura says:

    Funny how stuff like that can surprise someone. I remember the first time I was doing my (black) firend\’s hair. I was so surprised how greasy, yet stiff it was. I couldn\’t just braid it like mine, I had to really work the comb. Things you would just never even think about! 
     
    Hey, white folks do the same thing… keeping a hairstyle they are proud of. At least in my highschool, all of the cool (white) girls who went to Bahamas/Cancun for spring break would wear those braids and corn-rows they got done until they were all grown out…

  7. Antonella says:

    I love the new pic!!!!
     
    My kids always did the same, they were constantly all over my hair. They were begging me to let them braid my hair, so on the last day, I let them do cornrows in my hair. My hair\’s pretty thick, so they had no trouble. THey had a blast. I think I have a pic of it in my blog somewhere.
     
    Hope you had a nice weekend,
    Antonella

  8. Elizabeth says:

    It\’s nice to know that you go that extra mile in the name of education! LOL :")

  9. Karen says:

    I\’m glad your students like your new \’do too!  Have a great week!

  10. russ says:

    Good teachers are always teaching…
     
    Will it work the same for hubby though when he sees it??
     
    Have a great week!
    Russ

  11. Nadine says:

    Okay, Is it like shoulder length or short like a pixie?? You will have to show us!!

  12. K says:

    Growing up … I had a Fro.  It was always the topic of conversation anytime I walked into a room or class … especially with students of another ethnicity.  My hair would fascinate them.  Some wanted to braid it.. while others simply pulled on the curls out of pure amusement to watch it bounce back… But adults and kids alike were always in awe at just how soft it was… and still is.  So I can relate and understand what you are talking about.
     
    A teacher never stops teaching…  You seem to be building a fantastic raport with your students… one they will never forget as they grow up and away.  Good for you… it is very admirable.
     
    Ciao bella,
    KC

  13. Nooner™ says:

    Three Cheers for you! re: "it is an extension of their education".  You are so caring in your profession .. I can see it comes from your heart and soul .. Congrats!!
     
    Nooner

  14. Nooner™ says:

    Three Cheers for you! re: "it is an extension of their education".  You are so caring in your profession .. I can see it comes from your heart and soul .. Congrats!!
     
    Nooner

  15. Tracy says:

    That\’s so funny that kid thought it was going to go back to how it was.  You bring up so much about the differences that I don\’t even think about – thank you for that!!

  16. Cheryl says:

    Many years ago I was shocked when I found out they only washed their hair maybe once every few weeks.  It took till I retired to realize that nothing bad would happen to me if I missed my daily shower and hair washing.  So now about once a month i celebrate by not taking my shower….  Big To Do for someone so programmed in personal hygeine…

  17. Christine says:

    You sound like you are an awesome teacher.  I think that letting them touch your hair to teach them about a difference is cool.  Of course what is most important is our similarities.
     
     
    Christine
     

  18. Ula Meaven Wren says:

    ok so i totally think that it is awesome you let your students touch your hair to feel how soft it is! my mom used to teach eighth grade and she had awesome short hair that was electice blonde and had a kool V cut in the back. it was the koolest hair ever and all of her students acted like she was one of them because she was so awesome, but now she teaches at morehead state university and she has short brown and gray hair (she let the dye wear out) and when she runs into her old middle school students at the mall they are so amazed by her hair! it is just the weirdest thing ever!

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